Rush

Another fun shoot at Rush Hair and Beauty Bristol. I love photographing these guys, as beauty professionals they all have a strong visual aesthetic and aren't shy. The really put me through my paces.

Busy Busy Busy

Hello I know it's been a while ....

I've been busy, busy, busy with lots of projects in the pipeline.

Another photoshoot at Rush Hair and Beauty with the lovely  Leilah and her amazing team.

A set of portraits for TRESA (Totterdown Residents Environmental Social Action)

A video project and I'm exhibiting at the Totterdown Arts Trail with  two of my favourites  Photographer Jenny Frear and Abstract Artist Rachel Roche. 

Watch this space...

 

http://frontroom.org.uk/art-trail-bristol/index.php?view=show_artist&id=735O

EyeEm Paid

Whoop whoop! I've sold my first photograph via EyeEm, I made the princely sum of $2 which is not much but the sense of validation.......

Priceless!

FullSizeRender.jpg

Quiet in the city, there's silence in the lens. A personal project

Following my Saul Letter blog, I began to think about images that made me pause and reflect upon the different peaceful ways to view city life. 

Back to School

IMG_1765.JPG

 

What a week, my family now have a share in an allotment plot a life goal I've personally been aspiring to for almost a decade! But I'm absolutely astonished by how eager my husband and  kids are to 'get on our land' it's been a joyful time.

On a photographic note, I got too use a darkroom for the first time and another chance to play with cyanotypes. Oh what fun! Did I mention I've composed the first draft of my personal statement for my application to Bath College to study a HNC in Photography and my funding for this course has been approved! A huge obstacle overcome, To top that tonight I going to a private viewing in a real proper gallery, in which some of my work will be displayed Yas!!

The sun is shinning, spring is in the air and hopefully soon I'll be Back to School.....

 

 

 

Vivian Maier

A few years ago I read an article about a film called Finding Vivian Maier, about a reclusive Nanny who had secretly spent decades (1940's to 90's) photographing the inhabitants of Chicago and New York. Often in the most poverty stricken parts of the city, and sometimes with her small charges in tow! During this time she amassed over 100,000 images, approximately a of third which were unprocessed when she died in 2009

The story and the imagery lodged itself firmly in consciousness, I loved the fact that she photographed black Americans, the working classes and the poverty stricken and that she managed to do this despite the responsibilities of being a nanny. 

Many of her candid pictures give a real sense that the subjects were unaware of Maiers presence let a lone that they were being photographed and others have quite clearly been taken with the subjects consent. What appealed to me most about her work are the  pictures where the subject, despite the lens, and passing years seem to be looking directly at you. It can feel quite unnerving.  I have since read that Maier managed to capture theses naturalistic poses by holding the camera at chest level whilst talking to the subjects. I instantly and enthusiastically tried to replicate this technique,  It's really hard, Maier has been described as a reclusive, fairly aloof and secretive character,  I find it hard to imagine a person described  with those characteristics  performing this technique with strangers,  I would sincerely love to have witnessed her in action.

From a far of course

Saul Leiter

I love the of simplicity and depth that you find in black and white photography, somehow by stripping out colour you can add emotion and atmosphere. I often see images where the colours  are like a pre tantrum  toddler yelling 'look at me! look at me! look at me now!' but don't deliver an interesting or pleasing sight..

Saul Leiters use of reflections, light, shadow and distortion via rain or movement  blows me away, not only because his  photographs are so thoughtfully and beautifully composed, amazing when considering the unpredictable nature of street photography, but and this is the part that's important to me, the colours, they accentuate rather than diminish the image! Although Leiter shot in both colour and black and white it's  the colour photography that moves me.

The overall mood of Leiters street photography images for me provokes early childhood memories of visits to Bristol City Centre (or any busy built up area with lots of people).  Fascinating when his street photography has decribed as follows  ' He sought out moments of quiet humanity in the Manhattan maelstrom, forging a unique urban pastoral from the most unlikely of circumstances' 

Who knew 1970's Broadmead would be my 1950's Manhattan.

 

Good times with Frank!

In January 2014 I went away with some friends for a bit of Mummy R&R. One afternoon my friend Fran was treated to an impromptu (but much deserved) pampering session  by the others in our group. Fran had been pregnant and full of cold on the previous years break and as a result had missed out on lots of the fun. One friend did hair,  another make up, someone applied lovely new nail colours supplied by a forth person. In the meantime the hair stylist rushed off to get something other than the standard mum with a young baby uniform Fran to wear. The whole time there was copious amounts of chat and laughter.  Fran, gently chided the others for wasting their time nonetheless our friends continued proffering their loving and attention, it was beautiful to witness. As I watched this event evolve with fascination I felt a burning desire to contribute, but what was left to do, the initial offer to paint Frans nails had turned into a full on make over!

Once the big reveal was done I knew what I could do/attempt to do! I asked Fran to pose for me. I enjoyed the process of taking that picture capturing that experience so very much that it planted a little seed.  Like any seed it needed nurturing in April of that year along came 100 Happy Days! More about that later in the meantime here's the picture.  Good Times with Frank!